Here's some stuff.

Legit, if this blog were some physical stuff, it would be a pile of junk on the floor. The kind of pile that has some good stuff in it, but I'm the only person who cares and can find anything in it.

I'm a high school librarian, and I used to library blog as reading (with cats), but I ultimately decided I'd rather just keep it all here. So there's a few months of my library stuff there.

Also I super like Masterpiece.

my read shelf:
Emily's book recommendations, liked quotes, book clubs, book trivia, book lists (read shelf)

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  1. glaciallibrarian:

    An awesome call to action. 

     
  2. Comments
  3. literatureloveaffair:

There have been an alarming number of posts linking to pirated copies of books floating around lately, so I thought it’d be productive to share some of my own legal ways of accessing books instead of fighting the posts themselves.
If you would like to know more about book piracy and discussions surrounding the issue, here are some links:
25 thoughts on book piracy
Book piracy - an insiders perspective 
Why I stopped pirating and started paying for media 
The ethics of internet piracy 
The real problem with piracy 
Piracy is yesterday’s worry for today’s ‘artisan authors’
Kindle e-book piracy accelerates
John Green: Why libraries are different from piracy
Across the digital divide
Now on to some free books!
Libraries 
Libraries are wonderful. A collection of books that people want you to take home and read. What could be better?
If they don’t have a book you want, have a chat to the librarians. They are usually all very helpful and would love to hear suggestions of books, and even get the book you want in stock for you. 
Library cards are a wonderful resource, but depending on your library you may need a permanent address - if you can’t supply this that’s fine! You don’t need a library card to use libraries. Go in, grab a book, read for a while. 
Many libraries now have e-book borrowing services available. It is well worth checking whether your library offers this if you prefer reading e-books or even listening to audiobooks. 
Overdrive is a marvelous program that partners with many libraries to provide e-book lending, check the site to see whether any libraries near you participate!
Classics
Books in the public domain can be accessed for free in many formats 
Project Gutenberg offers a huge selection of public domain books in html, epub, kindle, and plain text format. 
Books in the public domain can also be found directly through the Kindle or Kobo stores. Both stores offer free apps for mobile devices and computers. 
LibriVox has an impressive collection of audiobooks of public domain books read by volunteers.
Misc. 
PulseIt features different young adult books every week that you can read online for free. 
If you enjoy reviewing, recommending, or blogging about books you might want to check out some sites offering review copies e-book copies of books. I personally use Netgalley. I’ve also heard good things about Edelweiss. 
Giveaways are another way to source free books, even if there is no guarantee of winning, what’s the harm in trying? Goodreads has a staggering number of book giveaways all the time, and there are always a few circulating in the Tumblr book community.
Kindle and Kobo also offer free or heavily discounted books often, so it is well worth checking them every so often to see if any of the free books catch your eye. 
These are the only completely free and legal ways to source books that I know of - feel free to add your own ideas. 
Go forth and read responsibly!

    literatureloveaffair:

    There have been an alarming number of posts linking to pirated copies of books floating around lately, so I thought it’d be productive to share some of my own legal ways of accessing books instead of fighting the posts themselves.

    If you would like to know more about book piracy and discussions surrounding the issue, here are some links:

    Now on to some free books!

    Libraries 

    • Libraries are wonderful. A collection of books that people want you to take home and read. What could be better?
    • If they don’t have a book you want, have a chat to the librarians. They are usually all very helpful and would love to hear suggestions of books, and even get the book you want in stock for you. 
    • Library cards are a wonderful resource, but depending on your library you may need a permanent address - if you can’t supply this that’s fine! You don’t need a library card to use libraries. Go in, grab a book, read for a while. 
    • Many libraries now have e-book borrowing services available. It is well worth checking whether your library offers this if you prefer reading e-books or even listening to audiobooks. 
    • Overdrive is a marvelous program that partners with many libraries to provide e-book lending, check the site to see whether any libraries near you participate!

    Classics

    • Books in the public domain can be accessed for free in many formats 
    • Project Gutenberg offers a huge selection of public domain books in html, epub, kindle, and plain text format. 
    • Books in the public domain can also be found directly through the Kindle or Kobo stores. Both stores offer free apps for mobile devices and computers. 
    • LibriVox has an impressive collection of audiobooks of public domain books read by volunteers.

    Misc. 

    • PulseIt features different young adult books every week that you can read online for free. 
    • If you enjoy reviewing, recommending, or blogging about books you might want to check out some sites offering review copies e-book copies of books. I personally use Netgalley. I’ve also heard good things about Edelweiss
    • Giveaways are another way to source free books, even if there is no guarantee of winning, what’s the harm in trying? Goodreads has a staggering number of book giveaways all the time, and there are always a few circulating in the Tumblr book community.
    • Kindle and Kobo also offer free or heavily discounted books often, so it is well worth checking them every so often to see if any of the free books catch your eye. 

    These are the only completely free and legal ways to source books that I know of - feel free to add your own ideas. 

    Go forth and read responsibly!

     
  4. Comments
  5. *sampling everyone who’s going to be a Newport*

    *knows perfectly well what Hurray for the Riff Raff sounds like*

    *opens the link anyways*

     
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  7. transformativetidbits:

    the-diebrarian:

    wiseacrewhimsy:

    medievalpoc:

    The history of straightness is much shorter than you’d think. An expert explains its origins.

    Blank mentions her personal story at the beginning of her provocative new history of heterosexuality,  “Straight,” as a way of illustrating just how artificial our notions of “straightness” really are. In her book, Blank, a writer and historian who has written extensively about sexuality and culture, looks at the ways in which social trends and the rise of psychiatry conspired to create this new category in the late 19th and early 20th century. Along the way, she examines the changing definition of marriage, which evolved from a businesslike agreement into a romantic union centered on love, and how social Darwinist ideas shaped the divisions between gay and straight. With her eye-opening book, Blank tactfully deconstructs a facet of modern sexuality that most of us take for granted…

    This intersects in some really interesting ways with art history, gender, and race. I like how the book’s premise is framed, as a sort of inverted look into History via queer studies.

    This is a really, really good book. It reads well and is interesting and accessible. I tend to get bored with academic social history but Hanne Blank is great.

    Just requested it through ILL! Awwwww, yeah. Summer reading!

    Hanne Blank also wrote a fantastic book on how the whole idea of “virginity” is much less a biological concept and much more a social construct. Also a great summer read and worth an ILL request!

    (Source: rhamphotheca)

     
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  9. throw-tribbles-at-them replied to your photoset “Done! Pattern is Two Zip Hipster by Erin Erickson.”

    you have mad sewing skills

    Listen I cannot talk up the designer's pattern writing skills enough. The pattern was kind of expensive (and is more expensive now than when I bought it last year), but I mean she spells out how to do all of the nifty little things that make it look super nice. 

     
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  13. Done!

    Pattern is Two Zip Hipster by Erin Erickson.

     
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  19. So helpful.

    So helpful.

     
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