Here's some stuff.

Legit, if this blog were some physical stuff, it would be a pile of junk on the floor. The kind of pile that has some good stuff in it, but I'm the only person who cares and can find anything in it.

I'm a high school librarian, and I used to library blog as reading (with cats), but I ultimately decided I'd rather just keep it all here. So there's a few months of my library stuff there.

Also I super like Masterpiece.

my read shelf:
Emily's book recommendations, liked quotes, book clubs, book trivia, book lists (read shelf)

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  1. joannathepiana:

    cleowho:

    "A bit short?"

    Tomb of the Cybermen - season 5 - 1967

    When a Doctor written in the 1960s is more ok with women wearing short skirts than a Doctor written in the 2010s, you know something has gone terribly wrong.

     
  2. Comments
  3. alloftimeandsass:

    tardiscrash:

    Oh shit, it’s on.

    OH NO YOU DIDN’T.

     
  4. Comments
  5. epicreads:


An Epic Chart of 162 Young Adult Retellings
     
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  7. 30. Beauty and the Beast

    I actually watched this like a month ago and then forgot to write anything up. Which is fine, because:

    Previous viewings: I have seen this movie so many times. This was my favorite movie for a long time, and is still my favorite princess movie. When I was in preschool, I wanted to change my name to Belle. This did not happen.

    This viewing: Like The Little Mermaid, I don’t know what there is to say, because I’ve seen it many, many times, and not just as a kid. CinderellaMermaid, and Beauty are what I think of when I think of princess movies, and Beauty is the one I find hardest to be critical of, because it’s the one I identified with most once I got past the carrying-Ariel-everywhere stage.

    One of my favorite things about this movie that is not the songs or Belle (which are obviously what Little Me loved about the movie and both of which absolutely hold up) is Gaston. Granted, not everything that leads up to Gaston locking up Maurice and leading a mob to the castle makes a whole lot of sense, but I love that he’s a very real villain, which frankly, fairy tales sometimes need, and he’s great as far as actually working into the themes of the story rather than just as a plot device. Not that most villains don’t play into the themes somehow, but I mean, as a villain in a story about deceptive appearances, selflessness, and the desire to experience and understand the broader world out there, he’s perfect. And sings like 3 songs to demonstrate how perfect he is, both as a villain in the context of this story and as a specimen of manliness.

     
  8. Comments
  9. Everyone who lives here is an adult. Thus, neon marbled Easter eggs.

    Everyone who lives here is an adult. Thus, neon marbled Easter eggs.

     
  10. Comments
  11. updownbindery:

harperperennial:

MEERKAT.

What is there to decide? 

    updownbindery:

    harperperennial:

    MEERKAT.

    What is there to decide? 

     
  12. Comments
  13. tvgrrrl:

    I think this may be my favorite episode of Bob’s Burgers ever.

     
  14. Comments
  15. Anne of Green Gables 

    Scenery Appreciation Post

    (Source: autumnskiesfall)

     
  16. Comments
  17. fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

themightyglamazon:

gehayi:

queenofeden:

perplexingly:

Daughter of a gun (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧ No idea if such a thing existed but surely there had to be girls born on board in the Age of Sail?

*puts on obnoxious historian hat*
*clears throat*
there were actually tons of women and girls on board ships during the age of sail and it’s really cool history that no one!!! ever!!! talks about!!! 
like captains of merchant ships used to bring their wives and children on board for long voyages all the time (and of course there were plenty of well known female pirate ship captains, and women cross-dressing as men, and prostitutes that more people seem to know of)
there’s actually a really amazing story of one woman, Mary Ann Patten who was the wife of the captain of this ship called Neptune’s Car. Captain Patten decided that he wanted her onboard with him and she was super about this and learned all about navigation and sailing and everything. so this one voyage they’re going around the tip of south america when her husband gets sick and is bed ridden with a fever right as the ship sails into one of the worst storms any of the crew had ever seen and it looks like they might lose the ship or have to stop
so you know who takes over??? the first mate??? 
no.
MARY
she took over the whole crew and sailed that ship through freezing water and pack ice and had it coasting smoothly into the san francisco harbour like it was nothing. and she did this all at age 19. while pregnant.
at one point the first mate tried to get the crew to mutiny against her but they all rallied with her and told him to shut the heck up because she obv knew what she was doing.
there’s a great book about women in the age of sail called ‘female tars’ by suzanne stark that i cannot recommend enough and has way more amazing stories and insights about the myriad roles women and girls played aboard ship during that time period.
(sorry i totally didn’t mean to hijack your post i love all of your art and this is gorgeous i just got over excited sorry sorry sorry)

We need links!
Female Tars: Women Aboard Ship in the Age of Sail by Suzanne Stark
Hen Frigates: Passion and Peril, Nineteenth-Century Women at Sea by Joan Druett
Hen Frigates: Wives of Merchant Captains Under Sail by Joan Druett
Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Seafaring in the Atlantic World, 1700-1920 edited by Margaret S. Creighton and Lisa Norling
Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920 by Joan Druett
Sea Queens: Women Pirates Around the World by Jane Yolen
Seafaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailors’ Wives by David Cordingly
The Captain’s Best Mate: The Journal of Mary Chipman Lawrence on the Whaler Addison, 1856-1860 by Mary Chipman Lawrence
Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly

I’M GONNA GET A LIBRARY CARD AS SOON AS I GET AN APARTMENT AND READ LITERALLY ALL OF THESE AND WEEP TEARS OF PROUD SISTERHOOD

deannawol:

Just a word of warning:  Sefaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailor’ Wives by David Cordingly and Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly are the same book.  I made that mistake and now own 2 copies of the same book under different publishing houses.  Literally no revisions between them.  It was also published under the name “Heroines and Harlots: Women at Sea in the Great Age of Sail”.

Reblogging for additional commentary

    fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

    themightyglamazon:

    gehayi:

    queenofeden:

    perplexingly:

    Daughter of a gun (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧ No idea if such a thing existed but surely there had to be girls born on board in the Age of Sail?

    *puts on obnoxious historian hat*

    *clears throat*

    there were actually tons of women and girls on board ships during the age of sail and it’s really cool history that no one!!! ever!!! talks about!!! 

    like captains of merchant ships used to bring their wives and children on board for long voyages all the time (and of course there were plenty of well known female pirate ship captains, and women cross-dressing as men, and prostitutes that more people seem to know of)

    there’s actually a really amazing story of one woman, Mary Ann Patten who was the wife of the captain of this ship called Neptune’s Car. Captain Patten decided that he wanted her onboard with him and she was super about this and learned all about navigation and sailing and everything. so this one voyage they’re going around the tip of south america when her husband gets sick and is bed ridden with a fever right as the ship sails into one of the worst storms any of the crew had ever seen and it looks like they might lose the ship or have to stop

    so you know who takes over??? the first mate??? 

    no.

    MARY

    she took over the whole crew and sailed that ship through freezing water and pack ice and had it coasting smoothly into the san francisco harbour like it was nothing. and she did this all at age 19. while pregnant.

    at one point the first mate tried to get the crew to mutiny against her but they all rallied with her and told him to shut the heck up because she obv knew what she was doing.

    there’s a great book about women in the age of sail called ‘female tars’ by suzanne stark that i cannot recommend enough and has way more amazing stories and insights about the myriad roles women and girls played aboard ship during that time period.

    (sorry i totally didn’t mean to hijack your post i love all of your art and this is gorgeous i just got over excited sorry sorry sorry)

    We need links!

    Female Tars: Women Aboard Ship in the Age of Sail by Suzanne Stark

    Hen Frigates: Passion and Peril, Nineteenth-Century Women at Sea by Joan Druett

    Hen Frigates: Wives of Merchant Captains Under Sail by Joan Druett

    Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Seafaring in the Atlantic World, 1700-1920 edited by Margaret S. Creighton and Lisa Norling

    Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920 by Joan Druett

    Sea Queens: Women Pirates Around the World by Jane Yolen

    Seafaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailors’ Wives by David Cordingly

    The Captain’s Best Mate: The Journal of Mary Chipman Lawrence on the Whaler Addison, 1856-1860 by Mary Chipman Lawrence

    Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly

    I’M GONNA GET A LIBRARY CARD AS SOON AS I GET AN APARTMENT AND READ LITERALLY ALL OF THESE AND WEEP TEARS OF PROUD SISTERHOOD

    deannawol:

    Just a word of warning:  Sefaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailor’ Wives by David Cordingly and Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly are the same book.  I made that mistake and now own 2 copies of the same book under different publishing houses.  Literally no revisions between them.  It was also published under the name “Heroines and Harlots: Women at Sea in the Great Age of Sail”.

    Reblogging for additional commentary

     
  18. Comments
  19. (Source: jackdonaghy)

     
  20. Comments